Supporting Parents and Colleagues in Diverse Communities

Supporting Parents and Colleagues in Diverse Communities

I’ve shared before that we must view our young AAC users as a whole. As SLPs we need to consider each student’s home environment, their culture and all those times at school when we aren’t around to watch and model AAC for them.  AAC use needs to occur everywhere, if the child is going to be successful with it.

Which means supporting and working with parents of emerging AAC users. It also means working with colleagues to support students and creating a team environment. As SLPs there is a lot we can do in this space. Including understanding the parents, helping them overcome barriers to access and seeking their input into plans.

Barriers families face

I work in a Title 1 school in the US and the families I work with often face barriers to getting access to AAC for their child.

Families, particularly those from diverse backgrounds are often not aware of their right to speak out and ask for things for their children. Or they don’t feel comfortable doing it.

That is if they know. For many of the families I work with, they are new to this country and don’t  realize AAC devices even exist or that services are available. There is often not a translator to help them ask.

If they do know to ask, in many states there is a lot of red tape and phone calls around accessing the support. Adding this on to stresses that families are already facing can just be too much.

As SLPs we can advocate for the family and influence what device they get. We also need to keep advocating after that first device.  We can make sure the student’s AAC changes with them as they grow. The child may have gotten a Big Mac and now has more capability. We  need to make sure they have access to that. We can also advocate when devices get old or break. It’s so important to keep that connection with the parents and advocate for them.

If the student needs AAC to access education then it is the school’s job to provide it. We can make parents aware of this.

Involving parents (and colleagues)

Your student is not going to get the best outcomes if we don’t involve parents and our colleagues in supporting the students. I get a lot of questions about how to do this. It isn’t always easy but it is possible by:

  • Building connections. As SLPs it’s our job to talk to the teacher and connect. If you’re doing an AAC evaluation then try to include everyone on the team. Give whoever is going to work with the child an opportunity to provide input and feel like they’re part of the whole process.
  • Keep lines of communication open at all times. Ask the teacher what are their goals for the student, what is in their IEP and how you can you help them to reach these goals. Asking where the communication breakdowns are right now is a great place to start.
  • Don’t make assumptions with parents. It’s important we don’t lead with our egos. Seek first to understand which may mean backing up a bit and slowing down. Just know it’s going to be a process. It isn’t going to be an overnight change. It takes years and years of building and growing. Making sure to involve everyone where you can.
  • Tell success stories. Have examples to share with colleagues and parents. You have to share these stories and get people excited and to see the possibilities. We want them to see what could happen.
  • Accept people will make assumptions about you. When you go into a community for the first time, people will make assumptions about you and this is ok. Don’t think you can change those assumptions immediately. Hang in there and keep talking to people. Attend everything you’re invited to.
  • Listen. I’m never the loudest person in the room, I’m more a person who watches. I don’t go in thinking I know everything. I let people show me who they are and have respect when learning about a different culture. I want my highest spirit to meet their highest spirit.
  • No professional jargon. Be really aware of not using professional jargon when working with families. Use parent friendly language and then introduce what the different terms we use all the time mean. This then helps them navigate the system without you.
  • Include the family. A key question is to ask parents is  “what would you like your child to communicate?” You can also program family names into devices.

Promoting Culturally Responsive Therapy

I want the children I work with to embrace their communities and I want to encourage other SLPs to do this too. To facilitate this I do the following:

  • Parent Groups. I’ve been facilitating these once a month via Zoom. They’ve been such great groups. I include parents and teachers and we talk about things like AAC and the importance of modeling as well as providing an opportunity for questions and answers. The parents have gotten to connect with each other which is so important.
  • Free Facebook Group. I’ve got a free Facebook Group for speech therapists, speech therapist assistants, teachers and instructional assistants who work with children who use and/or need Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC). This is a space to ask questions without judgement and to connect with others. You can request to join here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/theAACconnection.
  • Speaking at conventions. I often speak at local and national conventions. Baslcally any opportunity where I get to share the message about AAC and culturally responsive therapy.

There is so much we can do to support our families and colleagues and I love seeing parents sharing their culture with their children.

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How to Reduce Cognitive Load

How to Reduce Cognitive Load

Help your students succeed by reducing cognitive load for your students with special needs while they’re learning a new concept.

In this video I am talking about why we need to think about reducing the cognitive load as well as how to do this so we can help our students succeed and feel more confident. 

Want to know more about Core Vocabulary and AAC? Join my free Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/theAACconnection

 

 

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10 Ideas for Virtual AAC Modeling

10 Ideas for Virtual AAC Modeling

In this video I share 10 ideas for virtual AAC modeling. We are keeping it simple so that no one gets overwhelmed. We want to bring engagement, authentic communication and joy.

We are going to cover:

  • Using low tech AAC at home,
  • how to model during teletherapy,
  • ideas for parents, special educators and speech language pathologists.

This session was an early part of AAC in the Cloud 2020 in response to the changes with COVID19, school closures and teletherapy. FREE Access to resources and links mentioned are here for you at: bit.ly/aacathomeishere.

Thank you to Coughdrop AAC for facilitating this training.Pin

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FREE Speech App for Speech Language Pathologists

FREE Speech App for Speech Language Pathologists

Looking for a fun, engaging, interactive, FREE speech app for your toddlers, preschoolers, and young students with special needs?

I found an awesome one called Speech Blubs

This subscription-based app is free for SLPs for use on one device. Children mimic sounds and words while looking at videos of engaging kids. My primary functional skills classroom loved it when I used it as a reward activity during therapy. A couple of my students that generally won’t try to imitate words, actually tried this. I was sold right then and there.

The kids really enjoy seeing the kids in the app. It’s just so natural for them to imitate other kids.The colorful images are clean, super-fun and engaging. When you activate the camera the kids can see themselves on screen, which they love (it’s like looking in the mirror). In the Early Sounds section, the kids imitate an animal noise. When they do this, fun things happen. Donkey ears appear on their head or maybe even a duck.

You have to see for yourself in this short little video I made.

Isn’t that great?

If you feel you can use this with your students, go to the App Store and download Speech Blubs. Follow the prompts and make sure you indicate that you’re an SLP so you can get your free copy.

Guess what? For a limited time, I’m giving away 10 free codes for you to share with the parents of a student. I think this would be so great for practice and interaction at home. The code is good for a 6 month subscription. If you’re interested, just comment below with your favourite animal from the app. I’ll choose ten winners on Monday, September 18, 2017.

A Quick, Inexpensive Way to Get Started with Core Vocabulary in the Classroom

A Quick, Inexpensive Way to Get Started with Core Vocabulary in the Classroom

Do you struggle with planning functional communication therapy?

Do you leave those sessions feeling frustrated and like it nothing is working?

I sure used to.  And then I discovered the power of Core Vocabulary.

You can add structure, consistency and fun to your sessions by using Core Vocabulary. You’ll be amazed at how you can do more with less!

 It’s not just for labeling. These words are used to comment, request and command.

Of course, you want students to learn many other words, these are fringe vocabulary. But by focusing on core words you are teaching them a vocabulary that is used most often throughout the day and that they can use throughout their daily lives from classroom to playground to cafeteria to home.

So what exactly is core vocabulary?

Core vocabulary is a small set of simple words, in any language, that are used frequently and across contexts (Cross, Baker, Klotz & Badman, 1997).  These words make up 75-80% of the words we use every day.

I love to use big core vocabulary boards with my students. You can choose your core words from many sources and create your own board using symbols.

I just created this core vocabulary board. I spent months tweaking the size, the positioning of the symbols and using it with my students. Here’s what I love about it:

  • Big squares are easy for little hands to grasp and large enough to see clearly.
  • Made for classroom and/or speech room use
  • Uses DLM Core Vocabulary words which are evidence based

 

It’s available in my Teachers Pay Teachers store now.  Included with the board are two different choices of backgrounds, one vibrant and one more subdued. There is also a smaller poster to put on the classroom door to help with carryover. And smaller squares to use for lanyards to encourage use of the core vocabulary words throughout the day.

If you’re sold on Core Vocabulary but wondering how to get started, I also included enough ideas to get you through a few sessions incorporating wind-up toys and movement.

Click on this link to see the Big Core Vocabulary Board.

Psssssst…April 7th only….This is at an Introductory Price of just $5.00 (I know are you kidding me? That’s  a whole lotta resource, that will last a lifetime) 

I hope this gives you a good start. I don’t teach core vocabulary for the whole session, but consistently work it in for 10 to 15 minutes of each 30 minute session.

Keep coming back, because I’ll be sharing more ideas on how to use core vocabulary to make communication gains. Also join me on Instagram, where I share lots of ideas in my Instastories.

I’d love to hear from you once you’ve tried this. How did it work for you? What new ideas did it generate?

Hugs and high-fives,